River Lin

River is an independent writer and consultant. With a Master's degree in teaching English as a second language from Ball State University. She lived in Japan for 15 years teaching and editing. Now based in the U.S., she works for a variety of clients. Published work can be found in print, online at various websites, and at goarticles.com. River blogs about writing, design, cooking, pets and thoughts about life.

Allergy Symptoms in Children

Baby sneezing

Allergy symptoms in children often resemble the signs that indicate they are tired or catching a cold. It is important then, that you know what the common allergies are for children, what may trigger these allergies, and what to do if your child has an allergic reaction to something…

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What is the Best Natural Shampoo?

Shampoo bottles

There are plenty of choices in natural shampoos, so you may have to experiment with several brands and products before you find the best one for you. Not all natural shampoos are purely “natural” because it is the artificial additives that make most commercial (and natural) shampoos give hair its shine, create volume, and produce a sudsy lather. Therefore, it is important to know about the common chemical ingredients found even in many “natural” shampoos. It is also important to know what natural ingredients best treat specific hair needs…

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How to Make Natural Shampoo

Shampoo and towels

Here at Earths Friends we like to emphasize how important it is to pay attention not only to what you put in your body, but what you put on it. Why? Because your skin is sensitive, and chemicals that come in contact with it will absorb into your body…

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The Local Food Movement

Food outside at farmer's market

The word local is one of America’s hot new buzz words. Although the idea of buying locally grown food is not at all new, the local food movement has certainly picked up momentum in recent years and has therefore thrust the word “local” into all kinds of headlines. Forty years ago it was mostly grown hippies and environmentalists who promoted local food. College towns had food co-ops and bigger cities hosted weekend farmer’s markets. Today, politicians, white collar workers, blue collar workers, housewives, retirees, college students and people from all parts of society are getting on the local food movement bandwagon.

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